WIKI: Auxy v6's new sound shaping features

WIKI: Auxy v6’s new sound shaping features


MASTER :nut_and_bolt:

  • Compress: Compression is used to reduce dynamic range — the span between the softest and loudest parts of a sound. [1]
  • Attack: Attack is the time taken for initial run-up of level from nil to peak, beginning when the key is pressed. [2]
  • Release: Release is the time taken for the level to decay from the sustain level to zero after the key is released. [2]
  • Offset: Kiari Kendrell Cephus (born December 14, 1991), known professionally as Offset, is an American rapper, singer and songwriter from Lawrenceville, Georgia. He is a member of the hip hop and trap music trio Migos, alongside cousins Takeoff and Quavo. [3]
  • Glide: Glide is a portamento effect, when increased the amount of time it takes the note to “glide” up to the next is increased

NOTES:
[1] Audio Compression Basics
[1] Audio Dynamics 101

[2]
svg

[3]
02%20am


DIST

Clip

Clip Distortion is a nonlinear distortion effect that produces unpredictable harmonic spectra. It can simulate warm, overdriven tube sounds and can also generate heavy distortions.

  • Dist: Master Wet/Dry amount.
  • Drive: Clip Wet/Dry amount.
  • Knee: Controls the clamp curve as the signal reaches the positive and negative thresholds. [1]
  • Lowpass: Removes high frequencies from FX signal.
  • Highpass: Removes low frequencies from FX signal.

NOTES:
[1] ‘Hard’ knee
02%20pm
[1] ‘Soft’ knee
20%20pm

Bitcrusher

A Bitcrusher is a lo-fi (low fidelity) digital audio effect, which produces a distortion by the reduction of the resolution or bandwidth of digital audio data. The resulting quantization noise may produce a “warmer” sound impression, or a harsh one, depending on the amount of reduction.

  • Dist: Master Wet/Dry amount.
  • Crush: Bitcrusher Wet/Dry amount.
  • Rate: Downsamples (lowers sample rate) the original signal. [1]
  • Lowpass: Removes high frequencies from FX signal.
  • Highpass: Removes low frequencies from FX signal.

NOTES:
[1]
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Sineshaper

A waveshaper is an audio effect that changes an audio signal by mapping an input signal to the output signal by applying a fixed or variable mathematical function (in the case of sine shaping, a sine function), called the shaping function or transfer function, to the input signal. [1]

  • Dist: Master Wet/Dry amount.
  • Amount: Sineshaper Wet/Dry amount.
  • Phase: I’m guessing that this adjusts the phase (position in cycle) of the sine function? Edit me
  • Lowpass: Removes high frequencies from FX signal.
  • Highpass: Removes low frequencies from FX signal.

NOTES:
[1] http://msp.ucsd.edu/techniques/latest/book-html/node78.html

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Delay

Delay is an audio effect which records an input signal, and then plays it back after a period of time. The delayed signal may either be played back multiple times, or played back into the recording again, to create the sound of a repeating, decaying echo.

  • Delay: Wet/Dry amount.
  • Time: This is the time between the source signal and its echo.
  • Feedback: Feedback, or regeneration, produces multiple decaying repeats. Increasing the feedback value increases the number of echoes, as well as the resonance that is created as one echo disappears into another.
  • Ping Pong: Ping-pong delay is a type of dual delay where the first echo appears in the ‘ping’ channel (for this example: the left channel), delayed by the ping amount, and the second appears in the opposite ‘pong’ channel (the right channel), delayed by the ping time plus the pong time.
  • Self Duck: Sidechain compression triggered by master BPM.
  • Lowpass: Removes high frequencies from FX signal.
  • Highpass: Removes low frequencies from FX signal.

Reverb

Reverberation, in psychoacoustics and acoustics, is a persistence of sound after the sound is produced. A reverberation, or reverb, is created when a sound or signal is reflected causing a large number of reflections to build up and then decay as the sound is absorbed by the surfaces of objects in the space – which could include furniture, people, and air.

  • Reverb: Wet/Dry amount.
  • Size: The simulated room size.
  • Decay: This determines how long it takes for the reflections in the room to run out of energy.
  • Damping: The absorption of high frequencies in the reverberation. Low damping values yield less high-frequency absorption, whereas high damping values produce more absorption of high frequencies.
  • Lowpass: Removes high frequencies from FX signal.
  • Highpass: Removes low frequencies from FX signal.

Chorus

In music, a chorus effect occurs when individual sounds with approximately the same time, and very similar pitches converge and are perceived as one. While similar sounds coming from multiple sources can occur naturally, as in the case of a choir or string orchestra, it can also be simulated using an electronic effects unit or signal processing device.

  • Chorus: Wet/Dry amount.
  • Depth: Depth controls the amount of pitch modulation created by the effect.
  • Rate: The frequency, or speed, of the LFO.
  • Lowpass: Removes high frequencies from FX signal.
  • Highpass: Removes low frequencies from FX signal.

Volume

  • High Gain: A shelving filter’s gain setting is used to control the amount of boost or attenuation that is applied to the filtered frequencies.
  • High Shelf: A high-shelf filter is used to boost or attenuate the frequency spectrum’s high end.
  • Low Gain: A shelving filter’s gain setting is used to control the amount of boost or attenuation that is applied to the filtered frequencies.
  • Low Shelf: A low-shelf filter is used to boost or attenuate the frequency spectrum’s low end.
  • Gain: Master volume.
52 Likes

I wanted to get this up as quickly as possible, so there is definitely room for improvement…
Feel free to make amendments as you see fit. :sunglasses:

I plan on adding more information as I spend some more time with the app.
Happy to answer any questions, if I can… (some of my descriptions are a touch dry…)

Also, hoping the devs will chime in on a few things I wasn’t sure about.

21 Likes

Nice work!

This will definitely help new users learn more about the features added in version 6

8 Likes

wow this is actually really awesome. I’ve always wanted this :upside_down_face:

5 Likes

New features are incredible, this is what keeps me paying the subscription. Also thanks @icsleepers for the explanations man huge help to everyone.

2 Likes

Ah don’t thank me, @blakkaz put it together I just set up the thread. Please feel free to add on to it in places you guys want to, I set it as a wiki post.

5 Likes

My bad, thank you @blakkaz you legend!!!

4 Likes

I love you

Also, Icsleepers breath smells like cat food

9 Likes

Man it’s been awhile since I’ve been here in the disco. Saw the updates today and had to pop in to check the features thread. But this? This is juicy. Big props to blakkaz for putting this together and a thank you to icy for reppin’ .

New update brings a lot of possibilities

7 Likes

Well when one consumes quite a bit of cat food :wink:

6 Likes

Your a good man

To offer one bit of advice, look at the reverb controls. The damping and the LPF are basically two different ways of doing the same thing, taking some of the high end off the echo. Sometimes it’s nice to do this because when the reverb is too bright it can be too prominent, and muting it can make it sit in the mix better. But how much you choose to do so is mostly down to individual taste.

The HPF on the other hand is really your friend. When you get a lot of low-end going into the reverb, it is a major way to make your mix muddy really quickly. So using the HPF to cut the reverb below 100 or 200 (or even sometimes 400) can help keep the low-end very punchy and distinct.

5 Likes

Dub Delay: Set up a separate drum/sampler instrument, and go into the delay controls and put delay at or near 100%, and put feedback above 90%, maybe higher. Use the LPF to cut down to about 5K & the HPF to cut up to about 300, or you can go up to 1K even if you want a thin sound. 1/8. Is the most commonly used time, but not always.

Now what you do is : for any sample in another drum instrument which you want to put a long delay on, you load the same sample into here, and just program a single hit/note for whereever it is you want the dub delay to kick in. So your normal drums carry-on as always, but that one snare hit or whatever will keep echoing out for a bar or two or longer. Have fun.

5 Likes

Wow. This is amazing.

1 Like

This is gonna be the most useful thread on the disco for the next decade or so

10 Likes

oh my goodness than you so much for making this this is just what i needed

2 Likes

Re. Vol., Hi- Shelf EQ:

I’d be very careful with using this, because my experience with Auxy, and actually a lot of digital synthesis, is that you can find a lot going on way up in the highs above 10 K,. Since a high-shelf boosts everything above the point where it begins, if you set it to 2K or 3K to add a little treble to your snares or hats or whatever, realize that there may be side effects higher up the EQ spectrum.

The number one thing I find myself doing in mastering most with mixes from Auxy is cutting a bit in the extreme high end of the EQ.

2 Likes

So how do I adjust what was the “Tone” and “Shape” dials?

1 Like

Hey! One question, why can’t we use tone anymore?

You don’t - I should say you don’t automate them any more unless they are available controls. Every sound has different controls. Flamingo for example has these:

So because the instrument has shape and tone, you can automate shape, tone and pitch. For an instrument that no longer has shape or tone, like Boulevard under vintage keys, you only automate pitch.

2 Likes