The Unofficial Auxian (Auxyist? Auxyer?) Dictionary for Music Production

Us mobile music producers know a lot about how things work in a mobile DAW, from knowing the C major scale to Wubby Wubs, but there’s a lot of us here who probably don’t know what a piano roll is, or even a scale. So in this forum topic, post as many definitions as you can that haven’t been listed by other users and explain what those **f a n c y ** terms mean in the most simple way possible!

P.S.: Don’t go all full dictionary mode saying if the term is a noun or a verb, just type it like this:

BPM: The measure of a song determining of how fast it is

Also P.S.: This forum isn’t meant for tips and tricks, but an explanation is enough, but don’t go too into detail! Save that for another topic!

3 Likes

I prefer the term Auxician

3 Likes
  • Probably best to avoid using other words that are also keywords unless you’re being clear about their use - e.g. ‘measure’, which might also appear in this glossary. Will help promote clarity.
  • If a term is an abbreviation, it’s also worth including the unabbreviated version - e.g. ‘beats per minute’.
  • You might also want to mention related terms - e.g ‘tempo’.
2 Likes

EDM: Electronic Derivative Music

4 Likes

Dnb: Drum n Bass

1 Like

Sample Rate – In digital recording, the number of times per second that samples are taken. The higher the sample rate, the more realistic the digital reproduction of the sound, and the higher frequencies of the sound can be reproduced.

Bitrate – In digital recording, the number of computer bits used to describe each sample. The greater the bitrate, the greater the dynamic range of the sampled sound. The quality and resolution of an audio sample are described as a combination of sample rate and bitrate.

Nyquist Frequency – In digital recording, the highest frequency that can be recorded and reproduced properly, equivalent to a one-half the sampling rate. (For example, with the common sampling rate of 44,100 kHz per second, the Nyquist frequency would be 22,050 kHz.) Aliasing begins to occur with frequencies that exceed this threshold.

Aliasing – A type of digital signal distortion that occurs in a sampler when the incoming signal frequency exceeds the Nyquist frequency for that unit. The sampler reproduces it at an incorrect frequency, or an “alias,” causing a distortion or artifact in the sound.

Haas Effect – (Also called Precedence Effect) Simply stated, a factor in human hearing in which we perceive the source of a sound by its timing rather than its sound level. In his research, Helmut Haas determined that the first sound waves to reach our ears help our brains determine where the sound is coming from, rather than its reflection or reproduction from another source. The reflection of the sound must be at least 10dB louder than the original source, or delayed by more than 30ms (where we can perceive it as an echo), before it affects our perception of the direction of the sound. This is what helps us distinguish the original sound source without being confused by reflections and reverberations off of nearby surfaces. Understanding the Haas effect is particularly useful in live audio settings, especially in large venues where loudspeakers are time-delayed to match the initial sound waves coming from the source.

Early Reflections – The first sound waves that reach a listener’s ear after bouncing off a surface in the room, usually heard almost immediately after the initial sound. The first stage of reverberation.

Harmonics – Whole number multiples of the fundamental frequency that occur naturally within the playing of a tone. Mathematically, if the fundamental frequency is x, the harmonics would be 2x, 3x, 4x, etc. For example, if the fundamental frequency of the note played is 440Hz (or A-440), the harmonics would be 880Hz, 1320Hz, 1760Hz, and so on. The presence of harmonics in the tone is what creates the timbre of an instrument or voice.

Overtone – Any harmonic in a tone except the fundamental frequency.

6 Likes

IT’s Electronic Dance Music.

2 Likes

I’ve heard it.
It’s clearly derivative.

:hotdog:

1 Like

Enticing Discotheque Melodies?

3 Likes

:wink:

3 Likes

Our English mate throwing baseball gifs in here!
#Merica #GoStros